Friday, March 30, 2012

What replaces "yard" work at the cabin

"Bouquet" of rue anemone
This week I’ve spent some time each evening dragging around giant branches, tops of trees and cutting back the multiflora rose that’s not-so-slowly taking over the area behind the cabin. This spring the clean-up is worse than usual. The remnants from Snowtober still litter the woods, and not just around my cabin.

Those downed treetops have dried a bit, and I’m now able to drag them around a lot easier than I could shortly after the event. They are still large and heavy. One that looks like at least half of a tree, keeps getting lodged between other living trees as I try to drag it away from the side of the cabin. I moved it another 10-15 feet before it got stuck. I think I’m going to need a chain saw to move it any further. Or perhaps I’ll just sharpen the hatchet and try that. At least that 20-foot monster is no longer up against the cabin.

Cutting back the multiflora rose, that gorgeous invasive and thorny bush, is an ongoing issue. This year, I saw the start of the growth and moved in quickly. Then in 24 hours the size of the patch doubled. Last night when I wore out after dragging limbs and treetops around, I worked on that for a while.

The forest still comes right up to the doors and decks of the cabin, but I have to keep working with the brush to keep the forest from covering the cabin. As it is, last year I got behind in my brush clearing when the rains of April went on and on, and I never did catch up. It was a jungle back there, and I couldn’t even walk through it. This year, I’m trying to prevent that from happening. We’ll see if I’m successful or not. So far I’m almost holding my own against it.

8 comments:

Cathy said...

Maybe the forest is telling to get out its home ;-)

Looks like i'll be seeing some snowflakes tomorrow. Not whole lot but enough to make the day interesting.

John "By Stargoose And Hanglands" said...

It sounds as though you won't be lacking in firewood next winter.

Scott said...

Though it's a lot of work, you ought to cut the multiflora roses back to their stumps and paint the stumps with Brush-B-Gone. You use very little herbicide that way, you're not spreading the chemical throughout the ecosystem like you would it you sprayed the plants, and then you won't have to keep clearing the pernicious shrubs away year after year (except for new recruits, of course).

FOLKWAYS NOTEBOOK said...

Living out in the wild can be lots of work for sure. I don't bother with fallen limbs in the woods -- I let them decay as Mother Nature planned. -- barbara

Carolyn H said...

Cathy: Did you have snow--none here. The forest is certainly good at taking back what humans try so hard to clear!

Carolyn H said...

John: Yep! I should have plenty of firewood next year. The wood has already tried quite a lot since October

Carolyn H said...

Scott: I get rid of as much of the multiflora rose as I can, though i don't used herbicides on it. The plant is all around my land, so really get rid of it is impossible. I just want to be able to walk behind my cabin occasionally without getting stuck by the thorns.

Carolyn H said...

Barbara: Normally, I do just let the downed limbs decay, but after Snowtober, my roof was covered with limbs, and I simply cleared the roof as best I could. The limbs I tossed off were really close to the cabin, and now that winter is over, I worried about the fire danger of having the cabin surrounded by limbs and half-trees. So these I moved.